How To: Turn a Pumpkin into a Beer-Dispensing Keg (Perfect for Oktoberfest)

Turn a Pumpkin into a Beer-Dispensing Keg (Perfect for Oktoberfest)

Despite the name, Oktoberfest is in full effect worldwide with its huge festivals and specially brewed beers drawing in brewski lovers of all shapes and sizes. If the festivals are out of reach, maybe you should bring the festival to you before it's too late. By taking advantage of the same watermelon keg idea that everyone knows all to well, you can easily turn a pumpkin into a beer-dispensing fruit.

Melissa Klein, editor at Celebrations, shows how easy it is to turn a pumpkin into a pumpkin keg.

Basically, you just need a large pumpkin, a writing utensil, carving knife, keg tap, and lots of your favorite beer.

How to Make a Pumpkin Keg

To make the keg, start by outlining a circle at the top of the pumpkin. Carve out a hole and clean the pumpkin very thoroughly. Look for a spot to place your tap and carve out a small, very well-rounded hole with a serrated knife. If the pumpkin is very thick, clean out some of the inner wall lining so that the tap can pop in easily. Make sure the fit is tight and pour your beer into the pumpkin! It's as easy as that.

Image via celebrations.com

If you want to really impress your friends, try actually brewing your own beer in a pumpkin. It sure beats buying bottled pumpkin ale.

Have you ever made pumpkin beer at home?

6 Comments

I love it!

After a little looking around I found this great Pumpkin Ale Homebrew Recipe to go with it:

Wow. Home-brewing looks painful. One day I will try it out though! But I think I might try the simple pumpkin key for Halloween in the meantime. I think I'll cut out a slit in it vertically though and place some plastic or something in there so I can see how much beer is remaining (instead of just opening it). Maybe carve it like a jack-o-lantern.

Painful? It's one of the most rewarding things a beer lover can do.

Yeah. I hear you. But I think I'd want to start out small. Maybe with one of those home-brewing kits. Do they need a wort chiller? I think that's what scared me off, though ultimately it's probably a patience thing—he said it was 7 days in a primary fermenter, 21 days in a secondary, and 14 days bottled before he actually tried it out.

No, you can simply fill your bathtub with water & ice and chill it in there. It only takes a few minutes.

This is a great idea, I want to try it out. Thanks for sharing...

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